Skip to main content

View Post [edit]

Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Sep 19, 2019 12:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

I am thoroughly enjoying KB's "Country Music". But I know how this story ends- no matter how much they are gonna try and put lipstick on that pig.

So ... modern country that doesn't suck. Let's fortify ourselves for the last episode or two.

Here's a few

Hill Country Girl · Will Kimbrough > https://youtu.be/jMiniQqyV2c

Keep The Wolves Away · Uncle Lucius > https://youtu.be/-bATjVI0gNM

Luckiest Man · The Wood Brothers > https://youtu.be/LDy3rG6hQSQ

Reply [edit]

Poster: gmcgill Date: Sep 19, 2019 5:54am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Jason Isbell "Southeastern" and "Something More than Free" are great albums.

Reply [edit]

Poster: Mandojammer Date: Sep 20, 2019 1:27pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

100% agreement on SE and SMTF.

The Nashville Sound on the other hand is not.

Reply [edit]

Poster: gmcgill Date: Sep 20, 2019 1:35pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Agree!
Also, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit put on a great live show.

Reply [edit]

Poster: Mandojammer Date: Sep 20, 2019 1:53pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Still waiting to catch a show with his wife Amanda Shires on fiddle. While I don't care for her solo work much, she does bring a palpable dynamic and intimacy to her sit ins with JI and the 400U. At least from the videos I've watched.

Reply [edit]

Poster: gmcgill Date: Sep 20, 2019 1:58pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Agree. The last show I saw, she was in the band. I agree, she brings something to the show for sure.

Reply [edit]

Poster: Reade Date: Sep 20, 2019 8:23am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

My week was made by Vince Gill, who is such a delight in this film. The story about Chet Atkin's response to a guy who said, 'I just can't figure out what to play here..' being, 'Well, the melody usually works..'

Nice to see Chet featured so well in this telling. I've always drawn a straight line from him to Jerry given the clarity of their playing. Picking wise there were both devotees of the properly enunciated note, in a way my ear has always responded to with a gigantic 'Yeeeessssssssss.'

Reply [edit]

Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Sep 20, 2019 12:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

I don't know a thing about Vince Gill, but I was sent this by ms. micah a few days ago. She is using her mojo (f/b) to fortify herself for next week as well. We are kinda doing this together (along with you folks).

> https://youtu.be/SjZMDqnmBsg

Reply [edit]

Poster: Monte B Cowboy Date: Sep 20, 2019 1:31pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Bob Wills was the best band. Seeing his band in country music was like seeing the Grateful Dead in rock music. Episode 2 has the whole story. Bob Wills had the most exciting band for swing, improvisation, BIG fat sound, and live country music playing in bigger dance halls. This point was emphasized by myself many times on this forum years ago. It is clearly explained and articulated by Ray Benson. In episode 3, Ken Burns documents how things changed and how honky tonk music and Hank Williams came along. Ray Benson explains how the Honky Tonk joints were smaller, gigs paid less, and the band stages were much smaller... only room enough for eight people or less. So the bands got much smaller and the sound really thinned out, and the music changed forever. End of an extremely exciting era, the best there ever was, imo. Thank you, Ken Burns!

I've told numerous stories years ago about when, where, how and why I donated myself to Country Comfort, and what happened after that. I moved to Johnson City, TN in early 1975. It might have been March. Country Comfort's fiddle player was my friend. He shared a 3-bedroom upstairs apartment with the bass player and a college student. I was there a month or two earlier when I took a vacation down there to check it out. I crashed in that pad for a week. Seven people were staying there, including me. There were three girls from Florida on vacation crashing there that week. When I moved into this apartment as the fourth roommate, the landlady said, "Only three people are allowed to live in this apartment." I didn't find this out until I moved down there! Then I was told I needed to move out right away. So I had nowhere to live from the get-go. The student roommate told me he would be moving out soon, in about two months.

Wiley Cox was Country Comfort's mandolin player and lead singer. He had a very cool head shop business. His store was located in downtown Kingsport, Tenn. I was hanging out there a lot. You know, I needed to figure out where to live. Wiley told me he had an FCC 1st Class broadcasting license. He said he used to work in a TV station in L.A. when he lived there once. He was operating video tape recorders. Wiley said, "I got that job because I had my FCC ticket." He said he got his FCC license by taking a crash-course in electronics at Elkins Institute in Nashville, Tenn. He told me, "You should go to Elkins in Nashville and get your FCC ticket. You'd do good by that." So I said, "Alright man, why not? I already have one year of electronics school under my belt. I'll head out to Nashville. I'll go to Elkins. I'll get my FCC license. I'll be back in a month or two. Then I'll be your soundman." While I was going to Elkins and living in Nashville, I rented the hallway for $15 per week in a converted garage that had 3 tiny rooms ($20 per week), a hallway, and a bathroom. In June, I drove to Atlanta to get my FCC license. I passed the FCC's exams for 3rd class license, 2nd class license, and 1st class license.

My highlight living in Nashville was when I taped Vassar Clements and his Hillbilly Jazz band playing two shows at the Exit / In. This was a weekend in April 1975.

https://archive.org/details/vc75-04-04.AUD.fob
https://archive.org/details/vc75-04-05.AUD.fob

Six months later Wiley Cox left Country Comfort. The band fell apart. I was invited to live with the the Bluegrass Alliance musicians who lived as roommates at Harry Bickel's place in Louisville, Kentucky - a musician's "boarding and jamming house". Bill Millet, Bluegrass Alliance's banjo player, was Bickel's first resident. Doc Hamilton was the second resident at Bickel's. I became the third resident. That's when J.D. Crowe was recruiting Bluegrass Alliance's lead singer to be his band's new lead singer. Bill Millet got a young 17-year-old kid from Oklahoma he knew to replace him. The new kid moved into Bickel's place too, as the fourth resident, right around the time I moved in. His name was Vince Gill.

Here's the first time I taped Bluegrass Alliance, maybe a week or two after I moved there. https://archive.org/details/ba75-09-23.sbd.flac Here's the exact photo - Vince Gill, upper left - https://archive.org/download/ba75-09-23.sbd.flac/ba75-09-23.jpg

A couple of months later Vince Gill quit Bluegrass Alliance and joined Ricky Scaggs' band, Boone Creek. I taped them playing a gig in Louisville in March, 1976. - https://archive.org/details/bc76-03-20.SBD

A couple of months later Vince Gill quit Boone Creek and rejoined Bluegrass Alliance. By this time I was working at a TV station in Louisvillle. As band members rotated in and out of Bickel's place, and Vince was moving back in, it was getting crowded there. Due to this, Vince and I found a place nearby and we rented an apartment together. So, for the record, I was roommates with Vince twice.

Later in the springtime of 1976, I asked the managers at my TV station, "Can I make a show with the Bluegrass Alliance band? Can I record it on video tape? Will you put it on the air?" They said yes, yes, and yes. WDRB-TV's Steve Doss, Mike Harpring, and myself shared the "producer" credit. We taped the show with Vince Gill and the Bluegrass Alliance on two Sunday nights in a row. We used a Peavey audio board and some mics that were borrowed from Mike Harpring's friend who owned Far-Out Music, in New Albany, Indiana. We only had one camera in our studio. We decided to tape the show twice and make it appear that we had two cameras. On the first pass, we shot the close-ups and recorded the audio. On the second pass, we set the camera up on a wide shot. We played the tape back and faded between tape and our live camera. We mixed the video on our new Grass Valley production switcher. WAKY disc jockey Tom Dooley was the host of our show. He had really long, full, curly hair and a beard. The second week he showed up with short hair. Then we had to redo the show's intro package, and some of the "ins and outs," all over again. We didn't set up the questions for the interview ahead of time, so every time Dooley asked one of the players a question about the band, they referred him to band leader Lonnie Peerce. The songs were recorded on individual 2-inch quad tapes. I edited them into one long piece. I recall this show being sixty minutes long. This is just one of the many tapes I recorded that are gone, missing, or re-recorded over. I cannot locate these tapes.

Lonnie Peerce played fiddle, sang tenor, and was the frontman for Bluegrass Alliance. Lonnie was also the band's manager, and he gets credit for booking the gigs. In the summer of 1976 the band members found out he was shorting them on their pay. Tensions were building up for weeks. The vibes were crazy when we played at The Cowboy Bar in Jackson Hole, Wyoming the last two weeks in July. There was a meltdown one night. I wound up in the middle of it since I was their soundman. I had taken two weeks vacation time from my TV station gig. A bunch of us drove to Wyoming in Vince's van. John, Bob, and their wives drove with us in their vehicle. Lonnie went separately with his girlfriend. They drove there in Lonnie's RV. Then we set about with mischief and torment. We went crazy one night at their gig! The band started playing some new songs that Lonnie had never heard before. What the hell were they doing? Holy shit! I patched Lonnie's fiddle into our phase shifter effects box. I cranked up his effects. That fiddle sounded pretty wild! What in the hell was I thinking? I'm an idiot! Then Vince Gill yanked the coveted em-cee spot away from Lonnie. I mixed Lonnie's microphone level all the way down in between songs. There was no way the audience could hear what Lonnie was saying. I carefully mixed Vince's mic levels up so he could steal the frontman duty away from Lonnie. Vince was very entertaining that night, and the audience really enjoyed it. It was very memorable! Vince Gill is in the center of this photo from the Cowboy Bar - https://archive.org/download/ba75-09-23.sbd.flac/bluegrass-alliance-1976-02.jpg

Lonnie Peerce got back at the band for what happened in Jackson Hole. He was the one who signed the contract at the Million Dollar Cowboy Bar. They paid him directly. The rest of the band had to wait to be paid. They forked out a lot of traveling expenses for this gig. They eventually got paid, but not without a huge scene in Lonnie's front yard back in Louisville. There was a fight over the band's final pay. The scene ended when Lonnie chased Vince Gill down the street with a mic stand! Everyone in the band quit. The band ended up switching some sound equipment out.

The guys formed their own band and named it Lazy River. Photo of the new band, Vince Gill, center: https://archive.org/download/MonteBarrylr-vg1976-08-15-SBD/lr-vg1976-08-15.jpg They asked me to quit my job and become their full-time soundman. I gave my my two weeks notice to the chief engineer at the TV station. The band and I did not have a budget for purchasing sound system equipment. I owned some studio quality ElectroVoice mics and a pair of Bose PA speakers. I designed and built some custom-made wiring assemblies, a snake harness, and several stage boxes. This connected all the band's equipment, instruments, and vocals into the PA system and monitors. Then I invested my life savings. I purchased a 14-channel Tapco soundboard mixing system, and I bought some audio amplifiers for the PA. Here's the band playing - https://archive.org/details/MonteBarrylr-vg1976-08-15-SBD

Vince Gill and John Jump quit the band after a couple of months. Game Over.

But, we did one amazing gig with Mark O'Connor after that - https://archive.org/details/MonteBarrylr-mo1976-10-01-SBD

I tell a lot of stories. Read the liner notes in my tapes.
https://archive.org/post/1006694/more-info-about-ampex

At the end of the day, here on The Archive - a library, I took their mic and was an activist, among other things. I rested my case, a while back. Thanks, Brewster. Sorry if I took advantage of that. But today, Sept 20, while millions of school children around the world are striking and protesting for what I care about, well... that makes me feel like it was worth it.

Let's see if the Ken Burns film shows any of this stuff in Episode 7, which airs next Tuesday night, Sept 24. It begins in 1973.

Reply [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 20, 2019 2:51pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

You've been missed.

Reply [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 20, 2019 12:10pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Agreed!! Love him.

Is it just me or does Marty Stuart make you wanna throw up? Mrs Tell can't stand him...I have NO idea what he does (did) in the County Music Biz, but ugh...what an ego; and the over the top attempts at describing each person/contribution/etc he's asked about in such terms that it would make my posts seem...seem...well, as if I didn't have my smoking jacket on as Forumites used to say around here. He wants you to believe he's got the insight and personal connections to make the most profound comments...

Hmm, this almost does sound like me a bit.

;)

Reply [edit]

Poster: Reade Date: Sep 20, 2019 12:34pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Certainly the hair-do and the fact he's clearly pretty satisfied with himself makes the sledding a little rough there at times. The hair in particular- being on stage performing at the Ryman is one thing, but it just doesn't fit when you're squeezing cantaloupes in the grocery store or shoveling snow in your driveway, if you know what I mean.

I'm fighting those biases tooth and nail though as he certainly does have the resume. He said early on the only two jobs he ever wanted were the only two he ever had: He was invited to join Lester Flatt's band at age 14 (!) and did that till Flatt died, then played in Johnny Cash's band till lighting out on his own.
He does seem to bring it with some of his comments, if you can hold the other stuff at bay long enough.. and that's easier said than done surely.

Reply [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 20, 2019 12:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Ah, thanks for the insights--in a way, I almost felt like his interview persona was an exaggeration of what some of us have noted about our own Bob W. a time or two, eh? (Bob's "I was a roaming cowboy kid w a guitar around the campfire in another life" and so on).

I really have NO knowledge of CM stars the past forty yrs...It probably sounds like a veiled "and to prove it I'll say this", but I literally had to Google him when Mrs Tell got particularly upset. I then realized he clearly had some standing...

I'll try to hold it in check.

Reply [edit]

Poster: Reade Date: Sep 20, 2019 1:43pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Me either. No knowledge whatsoever. I read that stuff on Wikipedia to refresh my memory on what those two jobs he mentioned actually were. (Certainly hope you were able to talk Mrs. Tell off the ledge.)

Wonderful comparison to Weir. Stuff happens of course with self-perception, not only through age but also when you get that movie camera trained on you, and the hair and makeup and lighting people come in, maybe you get to feelin' a little special about things and the career you've had?

Still gotta keep it real though, and that's always the challenge with humans beings any time we choose to open our mouths. How about whenever Willie Nelson's on there talking.... doesn't he just fill it up? Never less than 100% warm and real and humble with his accounts. He's such a treasure among many in this wonderful film. (I like it so much more than his Jazz effort, and I can't figure out if he's made a better move this time, or just that I find this music more appealing.)

Reply [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 20, 2019 2:48pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Agreed again; Gill/Nelson (and many others, frankly) are humble and just seem happy to have a chance to kick it around. It's clear that the "music" or the "history" matters more to them than their place in it...or at least that's how it comes thru to us...that's what you like to see, right?

Reply [edit]

Poster: Reade Date: Sep 20, 2019 3:03pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Amen Brother Tell, in your rad smoking jacket.

Reply [edit]

Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Sep 21, 2019 12:35pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

I was the same about Marty Stuart for many years, and I've changed my attitude 180 degrees about the man, except for the fact that he's the ultimate Nashville insider. He has the chops. He's put in the time. He is the real deal on the history of country music, and was pivotal in the "Sweetheart of the Rodeo" tour that included Roger McGuinn and Chris Hillman from the original Byrds lineup. He was a loving neighbor to Johnny Cash and co-wrote a song with JC just days before his death. He was gifted the "holy grail" Telecaster that belonged to Clarence White (Byrds, Kentucky Colonels) with the original Parsons/White stringbender - as a gift from Clarence's wife - by no means a small token of affection. I don't like the way he comes off either, but behind the smarmy exterior, Marty Stuart has an honest, well earned reverence for the music and the people in the country music industry. So PM, get out your lint roller and touch up the smoking jacket a little bit - you still got it covered.

Reply [edit]

Poster: Monte B Cowboy Date: Sep 22, 2019 1:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Marty Stuart is the one in KB's film, thus far, who comments about feuds in country music and how "they run deep, I know." So there's more to come, trust me. Maybe he has some surprises. Bill Monroe's music was being discussed. The early episodes show Ralph Stanley and his brother were the first ones to imitate Monroe's music, but in their own style. Bill Monroe called it a ripoff and he was so pissed off he didn't talk to Ralph Stanley for like 25 years. KB's film shows how they used to pass by each other backstage at The Opry, in between acts, and they never spoke. This was Bill Monroe feuding 1.0. It led to the naming of Monroe's music as "bluegrass" because the Opry's audience requests for his songs had people too scared to mention Bill Monroe's name, afraid they'd piss him off, so they'd say, "Play some of that bluegrass music."

Bill Monroe feuding 2.0 was when Bill Monroe and the bluegrass music purists became angry with bluegrass musicians and bands who strayed from standard bluegrass music, standard chord progressions, or standard arrangements. This new sub-genre was called Newgrass. This feud was huge and it lasted for at least 10 years. It might have lasted 25 years. We'll see how Ken Burns calls it in Episode 7. At first there was Bluegrass music, and then there was Newgrass music. I've talked about this a lot. Sam Bush and the Newgrass Revival broke the Newgrass music sound barrier. - https://archive.org/details/nr75-09-28.SBD - Today it's called Progressive bluegrass music. That name doesn't sit well with me. Sam Bush and the guys named their band Newgrass Revival, not Progressive Bluegrass Revival. WtF? Hopefully KB will explain this stuff with more flair than WikiPedia. There's plenty to say about Clarence White, The Byrds, Jerry Garcia, Old And In The Way.

Bill Keith's banjo-playing style needs to be discussed. His contributions are ridiculously underplayed. It's tantamount to writing Jimi Hendrix out of Rock 'n Roll music history! Bill Keith made 'Newgrass music history' when he played with David Grisman, Clarence White, Richard Greene, and Peter Rowan in The Muleskinner Band before a live audience on February 13, 1973 at the KCET television studios in Hollywood, California. YouTube clip - including credits, "Dark Hollow" https://youtu.be/1hS04dmZw3k

When Garcia studied a record, he really studied it:
“I wasn’t playing guitar so much, I’d picked up the five-string banjo in the army." Jerry said he spent hours listening to records slowed down to 16 rpm to learn solos off them. Marshall also lent Jerry a copy of Flatt & Scruggs’ "Foggy Mountain Breakdown," and he fell in love with it. Bluegrass was becoming his main love, and over the next couple years, the banjo became his primary instrument. Garcia said of the banjo that he was drawn to “the sound of the instrument, and then the fire, the speed and all that. I was attracted to the intensity of it, really. And I was drawn to that incredible clarity – when something is going along real fast and every note is absolutely clear. That, to me, was really amazing – the Earl Scruggs instrumentals…the Mercury album that’s got ‘Foggy Mountain Breakdown’ on it and ‘Pike County Breakdown.’ I just couldn’t believe the sound of it. It was just startling.” Of banjo players, Garcia said that Earl Scruggs was “the number one, primo influence” – but he also listed Don Stover, Allen Shelton, Ralph Stanley and JD Crowe. “Those are my favorite banjo players. I think there’s something about [three-finger] rolls – you know in those days, pre-Keith banjo style, you either played rolls, or else there were guys who played single-string stuff like Don Reno and Eddie Adcock. I preferred the kind of problem-solving thing of trying to figure out how to make melodies work out of rolls.” Garcia also saw Bill Monroe’s band down at the Ash Grove in 1963 with a new banjo player, Bill Keith. Sandy Rothman recalled, “Garcia reacted to Keith’s playing immediately… From that point on I didn’t hear Jerry work as hard on any other banjo technique. With great diligence he set to work mastering the entire fretboard, ‘Keith-style.’
http://www.archive.org/download/jg1981-07-10-Interview.shnf/Garcia1981-07-10d1t9_vbr.mp3
Greg Harrington: "Jerry, not many bands, if any, aside from The Dead allow people in to tape record their concerts. [Jer agrees: "ah-huh"] And it's something that The Dead have always done. [Jer: "yeh"] And, what are your feelings along this line? It brings a lot of joy to a lot of people." Jerry Garcia: "Well my feelings are the music is for the people. You know, it's like ahh... I mean after it leaves our instruments, it's of no value to us. You know what I mean? It's like, what good is it? So it might as well be taped, my feeling is. And if people enjoy taping it, and enjoy having the tapes to listen to, that's real great. I can sympathize with it, because I used to do a lot of taping myself when I was in a Bluegrass band. I went out of my way to tape shows, and I know what that's like. And since what we do is live music, I mean that's ahh..." Greg Harrington: "Well I think the tapes really capture the magic of the band." Jerry Garcia: "Well, that's what everybody says. That's why people tape, you know. So I certainly can't fight with that, you know. I don't understand why people would object, you know. That's the way I feel about it."
Newgrass Revival band with Sam Bush formed when they quit from Lonnie Peerce's Bluegrass Alliance in 1971. Five years later the Lazy River band with Vince Gill formed exactly the same way. Both bands had big feuds with Lonnie Peerce. Lonnie owned the band's name. That Bluegrass Alliance name got paying gigs. He was the boss. So we have all these feuds going on and all this Newgrass music frothing. More feuds. Rebels and innovators feuding. That was the scene where I was at. When I attended big bluegrass festivals back east in the 1973 - 1976 era, the promoters put the bluegrass bands in the prime time slots, and the newgrass bands and hippie bands played late at night. Hippies, bluegrass lovers, and purists were kept happy. Promoters made money from everyone. Newgrass Revival played at the first Telluride Bluegrass Festival in 1973, when Episode 7 begins. Sam Bush has played there every year since. Festivarians call him the king of Telluride.

When I started circulating my old tapes in 2008, I contacted some of the guys from Bluegrass Alliance and Lazy River to let them know and get their permission. "Producer(s)" heard my tapes and jumped on that immediately. They promoted a Bluegrass Alliance musician's reunion. They called for a 40-year Newgrass music anniversary celebration. Producers named it "Bluegrass Hotel" (a.k.a. Harry Bickel's place). There was going to be a coffee table book published about it. So we all (most of us) gathered at Bickel's place in December, 2008. Just before that, there was a special Bluegrass Hotel celebration with Vince Gill, including a star-studded private concert in Nashville at the IBMA music awards. It was taped for this project. Then we gathered and shot a ton of videotape at Bickel's place. Cameras went to Bowling Green, Sam Bush's home town, and shot documentary footage and interviews. We had newspaper coverage and radio interviews in Louisville.

https://bluegrasstoday.com/bluegrass-hotel-newgrass-turns-40/
"Another major benefit concert is scheduled for March 20, 2009 in Louisville, KY. The show is intended to mark 2009 as the 40th anniversary of newgrass music, and the crucial role that Louisville played in its birth and development. In fact there is much more than just a concert in store for the Ruby celebrations. A documentary DVD, audio CD/LP and a coffee table book are all scheduled for a fall ’09 release centered around The Bluegrass Hotel, an informal bluegrass rooming house for L’ville grassers in the 1970s."
I was the web master for the Bluegrass Hotel web site. On Dec 14, 2008 there was a concert in Louisville with Sam Bush, Tony Rice, John Cowan and others. The place was packed. The music fans and the historians loved it all. We had a ton of momentum going. But the main producer forgot/neglected to get waivers signed for all the artists who performed (and would be performing). The first artist to realize this problem got into a dispute over this. Then he dropped out, because he had to. It violated his recording contract(s). Then other artists dropped out, being loyal to the first artist dropping out, and not wanting to get into any feuds. Then there was a feud about all this feuding. Can you believe this shit? These guys are my friends. Then the lights went out.

Bluegrass Hotel cover shot at Bickel's place - Dec 14, 2008
L to R: Tony Rice, Curtis Burch, Dan Crary, J.D. Crowe, John Cowan, Sam Bush
https://archive.org/download/ba75-09-23.sbd.flac/bluegrass-hotel-wfpl.jpg

Lights, Cameras, Action - Belle of Louisville - next to The Galt House - Dec 14, 2008
The boys are hustled downtown for some more promo shots, like this one.
https://archive.org/download/ba75-09-23.sbd.flac/belle-of-louisville.jpg

Bluegrass Alliance alumni shot in front of Harry Bickel's front door
photo provided by Bill Millet - Gee, I wonder why it's black & white?
https://archive.org/download/ba75-09-23.sbd.flac/TheBluegrassAlliance-alumni.jpg

Rudyard Kipling club, Bluegrass Hotel concert, Louisville - Dec 14, 2008
photo provided by Bill Millet - Gee, I wonder why Tony's pic is chopped in half?
L to R: Dan Crary, Sam Bush, John Cowan, J.D. Crowe, Tony Rice
https://archive.org/download/ba75-09-23.sbd.flac/rudyard-kipling.jpg

Marty Stuart was correct! Lots and lots of feuds. I would add, there's a rich history and lots and lots of story telling. The rest is history, minus a ton of money each of us spent to go down to Louisville for that rendezvous. Fans became unhappy when a future concert was canceled and ticket refunds were involved, if I remember correctly. It ended so badly, I don't even try to remember exactly what happened. Bill Millet is sitting on all the Bluegrass Hotel footage. Hours and hours of it, in HD, multi-camera, soundboard tapes, jam sessions, numerous lengthy interviews at Bickel's place - including videotapes and photos of me and with them at Bickel's, and me and them at the concert. Do you have any idea how many times this has happened to projects I've worked on? Get this: Here's a huge batch of "lost tapes" that I've worked on, poured my heart and soul into, and I know exactly where they are! That's bluegrass and country music show business for ya! What will Ken Burns say? He'll need to sign a pile of waivers knee-deep to let this horse out of he barn. Maybe KB's crew and Millet got into a big fight discussing it. Fasten your seat belt, or not. Ken Burns has to say something about some of this stuff and these guys. He'll have to do it carefully and skillfully. Ken Burns is a master documentarian and story teller. Ditto what you guys said: "Thankfully, KB pulls the plug at 1997." I have high expectations for episode 7. But, this thread is my back up, for posterity's sake, just in case. Thanks for your comments. I think we've got it covered.

I confess, my other comment in this thread neglected to mention Glenn Lawson is the name of the musician J.D. Crowe recruited from the Bluegrass Alliance in September 1975, and Vince Gill replaced him when he was 17, when he was recruited by Bill Millet. Vince's career took off from there.

In 1974, J.D. Crowe's bluegrass band had Tony Rice, Ricky Scaggs, and Jerry Douglas playing together. J.D. Crowe played banjo.

Jerry Garcia, OAITW photo, June 8, 1973 - https://web.archive.org/web/20140409174327im_/http://www.relix.com/images/relix_cms/2012/08/01/37508/oitw1973_1.jpg

Jerry Garcia, GD photo, June 9, 1973 - https://archive.org/download/MonteBarrygd73-06-10.AUD.fob.barry.flac/gd73-06-10_aux_pa.jpg

YouTube clip of Bluegrass Alliance playing "One Tin Soldier" in 1971. Tony Rice and Sam Bush are in the band.- https://youtu.be/f_Q_fkvCLnY This post was modified by Monte B Cowboy on 2019-09-22 20:32:33

Reply [edit]

Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Sep 22, 2019 8:52am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

According to the producer of the documentary they employed a person full time for the duration, just to secure rights and permissions. As for the bluegrass evolution, we'll see how far they veer off course from corporate Nashville and into the genre. There will surely be vignettes of the players that Emmylou moved through her early bands. Ricky Skaggs and Vince Gill figure prominently, but then they went mainstream. I'm also interested in seeing if they cover Southern rock as an offshoot...

Reply [edit]

Poster: Monte B Cowboy Date: Sep 22, 2019 4:26pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

What Deadheads wanna know is, how much will we see about Jerry Garcia, Grateful Dead, OAITW, and the Pizza tapes? How much of this country music stuff do I have to listen to, just for this? What Country music fans wanna know is, how much Jerry Garcia music and all his ventures do I have to listen to, when all I wanna hear is country music? Wikipedia says:
The Pizza Tapes is an album by Jerry Garcia (acoustic guitar, vocals), David Grisman (mandolin), and Tony Rice (acoustic guitar). It was recorded at Grisman's studio on two evenings in 1993, and features unrehearsed performances of folk and bluegrass songs. It was released on the Acoustic Disc label on April 25, 2000.
I guess the Pizza tapes are out? Or are we spliting hairs here? KB pulls the plug in 1996? It's gonna be down to the wire. This Tony Rice interview from 2002 is a fantastic information trove. It also included the famous Jer, Tony, Dawg pizza tapes photo. I had to pull them from the Wayback Machine. Ken Burns and Brewster Kahle do good teamwork in my world. Ken Burns Country Music Documentary appendix #1, surprise ending, or missing in action:
excellent Tony Rice interview Dawg • Tony • Jer at the pizza tapes recording session. Tony is beaming.
grismanricegarcia.jpg

Reply [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 21, 2019 2:24pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

You and Reade have me convinced (and so did my google work). Clearly accomplished; sometimes the ego gets in the way w these sorts, and no doubt doing the show he wants to bring his knowledge and relationships to the fore (which is as it should be).

My own Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker were notorious for letting the interviewer know that they were so far above the competition that it really wasn't worth talking about...imagine Baker being interviewed for the history of R&R drummers?

Reply [edit]

Poster: gmcgill Date: Sep 22, 2019 7:15am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Same for me. Put off by the "look" but then saw Marty and the Fabulous Superlatives as part of the "Sweetheart of the Rodeo" anniversary tour (Town Hall in NYC) and I was blown away by Marty and his entire band. And as noted, very cool to see him play Clarence White's guitar with original stringbender. A friend suggested the "Way Out West" album and he was right. It's not mainstream modern country. In fact hard to describe the album exactly, except to say it's very enjoyable.

Reply [edit]

Poster: Mandojammer Date: Sep 20, 2019 1:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Older Sturgill Simpson. Not really sure where his "new" direction is going to go.

High Top Mountain is badass.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMkhsamX-2I

Metamodern Sounds in Country Music is another fine piece of work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4DSBauoMig

Reply [edit]

Poster: mcglone Date: Sep 21, 2019 6:00am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Been a big fan of the Ken Burns ‘effect’ for 29 years. Hearing Jay Unger’s Ashokan Farewell for the first time stopped me in my Irish tracks (Hello,WT). That goergous 1983 fiddle lament seemed born from both sides of the Appalachians, propelled me to investigate Old and in the way recordings, through the haunting 6/20/1992 out of space shenandoah passage to The Pizza Tapes and beyond...

I’ve been on a number of mini musical pilgrimages through your fair land over these past few months, still searching for that sound, and for me, I think I found what I was looking for with today’s wandering minstrels. Between Billy Strings in Buffalo (check out his attached acrostic poem), Willie Watson ( Ketch Secor’s old buddy) in Naples, Molly Tuttle and young cannuk, Colter Wall it’s been nothing but fun looking under new, old rocks. Still a big fan of Dave Rawlings and looking forward to hearing Tyler Childers voice up here in early December. To me, the kids ARE all right.

My heart and ears will always choose Bristol over Nashville. This I know to be true. Looking forward to episode 5 this Sunday.

This post was modified by mcglone on 2019-09-21 13:00:57

Attachment: C2622D98-E80E-4926-BE0E-22AA36E258AD.jpeg
Attachment: DECEDC00-B17E-4652-8DAB-5737AFDA9B9E.jpeg
Attachment: 0A95D39A-1898-4063-A223-79A112EAEC18.jpeg

Reply [edit]

Poster: truckin52073 Date: Sep 24, 2019 1:01pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

I am in no means an expert on country music, however I think I have a pretty good grasp on what's good and what sucks. I was raised up on the classics. My mom had this radio in the kitchen that was on 24/7/365 and it was just loud enough to where if you wanted to listen you could or if you wanted to participate in the conversation going on around the kitchen table you could. The kitchen was always the gathering place and that radio was a staple and gave a love and appreciation for classic country. That said, I had run into a similar dilemma...New country that doesn't suck. Well, I believe I found it...I was turned on to this guy from the Joe Rogan podcast and I was so impressed with this guy that I was actually hesitant to check out his music in fear of it not being as cool as this guy. I digress...Two words...Sturgill Simpson. This guy is the real deal. His album Meta-Modern Sounds in Country Music is just that. An album, a rarity these days, something that can be listened to all the way through. But I was blown away. When I listened to it, it took me through a roller coaster of emotions. I laughed, cried tears of sorrow, tears of joy. (I mean I wasn't balling.) It did hit a place deep down. This was about a year ago and I purposely have to take it out of rotation so I don't get burned out. Right away, I could pick out parts and think damn, that sounds like Waylon, or that sounds like Merle, or that guitar sounds straight out of 1968 Buck Owens. So yeah, the influences are there but he does it in such a way that now I just hear Sturgill Simpson. Seriously check it out.

Reply [edit]

Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Sep 19, 2019 11:53am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Luckily KB pulls the plug at around 1996, so it doesn't get as bad as it could. For a gear head it's a drool worthy documentary. Some of the guitars, mandolins, pedal steels, and the amps that are shown are incredible! As for modern country, it's pop music to me, but some of the old standard bearers like Marty Stuart & The Fabulous Superlatives as well as Vince Gill are putting out some good retro themed vibes. I'm considering springing for tickets to a Marty Stuart show just to see Clarence Whites Telecaster, that I last saw in Clarence's hands 49 years ago...but that's another story.

This post was modified by Earl B. Powell on 2019-09-19 18:53:36

Reply [edit]

Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Sep 19, 2019 1:39pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

> Luckily KB pulls the plug at around 1996

Praise the Lord for small mercy's. I've seen snippet's of Garth flash by in episodes 1-4 and it has directly led to my request to fortify myself for next week.

About that other story, I'm listenin' > https://youtu.be/hAFsnni6STc

Reply [edit]

Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Sep 22, 2019 1:15pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

https://youtu.be/r8H08Xs_w8A

Reply [edit]

Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Sep 23, 2019 10:21am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

That's quite the Frankenstein guitar.

I got a complaint Earl. I may have had hit the wall early with “The Sons and Daughters of America” episode last night. KB did his usual turn into Howard Zinn lite when his series hits the 60s. Same old tired ground mowed over again. Same old turn from the topic (Vietnam, Baseball, Jazz), as the primary focus shifts to political and cultural events. Trouble is it's looking at the same half of the full picture, over and over again. You would think that maybe with this topic he would have looked more deeply at the other movements that took place at that time. One example is the birth of the modern conservative movement. Maybe he would like to inquire why? (And leave the Zinn out, please.) Maybe he would like to leave the comfortable narrative of the 60s that seems to believed as gospel and really explore?

A lot of bias. A lot of the same manufactured narrative. A lot of me skipping whole portions to get to the music. I wish he would stop selling me his particular brand of history and focus on our delight- the music. I love KB early. It blossoms into something quite moving in the middle. And then it quickly turns to shit towards the end.

Reply [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 23, 2019 2:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

I wonder if it's because the other movements are lacking a sound track? Not to be flip, but in general, the progressives/leftists/etc are the ones w all the good songs, to paraphrase Tom Lehrer, eh? Har, har--but, I do think it's true..as a general proposition? I haven't watched the episode, so I am winging it here...

Regardless of that, though, I hear you about any one w a cause getting boring darn fast...ahem. And I've similarly bored you all many times w my take on the sugar coated 60s and its problems.

Reply [edit]

Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Sep 23, 2019 2:27pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

> I wonder if it's because the other movements are lacking a sound track? It's there. It's everywhere. Often "hiding" in plain sight.

I'm not interested per se in the left/right dynamic, but can we look at this thing from a different pov? Can we hear different voices? Can we shake it up and follow the muse?

I recall after watching his Vietnam series how angry I was that he did not speak with anyone who fought for ARVN. Why not? I would have liked to hear why they did so. What were those folks thinking? What was it like?

I worked with a man in the late 80s who was a boat person and whose father was in the ARVN (and re-educated post '75 until they escaped in '78). He spoke with as much nationalistic fervor as the many voices I heard KB interview from the north. It is the selective editing that grabs me the most. I want to hear all the relevant material- not just what fits the assumed narrative.

Reply [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 23, 2019 2:55pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

Sorry, I meant soundtrack in the v superficial sense of "#1 hits"...the sort of thing you follow in a music history special. Lacks depth, follows bias, as you note.

Reply [edit]

Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Sep 23, 2019 3:19pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

music, music, music, music. the rest, ehh

(mind candy > https://youtu.be/GeoDIVVP20M)

Reply [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Sep 23, 2019 4:12pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

I hear ya!

Reply [edit]

Poster: Monte B Cowboy Date: Sep 23, 2019 3:48pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

To Earl's point, we could use a searchable transcript to go with these Docs. (a.k.a."text file") I said the same thing last time around, covering his Vietnam Doc.

KB is either a JG & GD deleter, or he's not. Ken finally pierced the "Jerry firewall" by teasing everyone with that 10-second full-frame shot of Jerry at the end of episode 1, punctuating the point about Jimmy Rogers songs. But that point had already been vociferously made. Was Jerry's image being used as a PR stunt to coerce more fans into watching every minute of every episode to increase potential sales and profits? That would be the case if there's nothing else about Jer in this Doc. But, Ken Burns has boxed himself in now, on purpose, so I'm betting he's gonna show "it." Therefore, it all boils down to context and delivery.

What's KB up to? We'll find out what happens tonight and the next 2 nights, episodes 6 - 8. Picking up in 1968.

https://archive.org/post/1083419/i-never-tire-of me posting comments about another KB Doc from my era. I shredded his Vietnam Doc for being deleter-in-Chief of Jerry and the boys. They were never mentioned! In the case of Peter Coyote not saying the "Jerry" word, I've written he may have a conflict of interest with Ken Burns because Peter and Jerry were acquaintances. (See the photo of Jerry and Coyote.) "Can we get some Waivers signed, please," and get on with it? WtF? Historically, I've covered both Docs with my comments.

Moron says to the village idiot: When will Ken Burns feature anything about Jerry or GD?

Village idiot says to the moron: When Ken Burns does a Doc about Dark Star Orchestra.

Do you think KB will have Kris Kristofferson commenting at the ending, during Bobby McGee'soundtrack, while they mix between Kris singing it, and then Festival Express singing it - https://youtu.be/smXHC7Pmboc - and then Janis singing it? Nah, that's too easy-peasy, and it's not country enough. This post was modified by Monte B Cowboy on 2019-09-23 22:48:58

Reply [edit]

Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Sep 23, 2019 10:37am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

I know what you're getting at, and can only say that "Country Music" is just another avenue to plug in KB's formula. Unfortunately you have to sift through piles of coal dust to find the diamonds. It's like a treasure hunt, and I stay so focused on waiting for those moments of true wisdom to drop that I've almost totally tuned out Peter Coyote's narrative. (As you say, because it's the same voice over from Vietnam and Baseball.)

At the end of the day, I'm hoping for a searchable repository of everything they collected to be seen in it's raw form. That would be the real treasure...

Reply [edit]

Poster: Vermoontains Date: Sep 19, 2019 3:38pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Brother can you spare a song? Looking for modern country that doesn't suck.

I had that feeling about how it ends for the Dead doc and skipped part 6.

I guess this is old not new but its 2014 and they are a lot of folks dancing to John Anderson - I'm Just an Old Chunk of Coal

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNeU1u3r2z4